GASPAR SALADINO in OTHER B TITLES

All images © DC Comics. From BEOWULF #3, Aug-Sept 1975

This article catalogs Gaspar Saladino cover lettering from six titles that did not have enough of his work to warrant a separate article in my opinion. There were no stories lettered by Gaspar in these titles. For instance, the cover above is the only Saladino lettering in the short-live series BEOWULF. Gaspar designed the logo and lettered this caption, and probably also the blurb at the top, which was also used on later issues. Even as the main cover letterer for DC at the time, Gaspar wasn’t assigned to do every issue. Some used only type, which is true for this series, some had no cover lettering, and some were lettered by production staffers like Joe Letterese, John Workman from 1975-77, and myself starting in late 1977.

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GASPAR SALADINO in THE BRAVE AND THE BOLD

All images © DC Comics. From THE BRAVE AND THE BOLD #71, April-May 1967

THE BRAVE AND THE BOLD went through three phases in its long existence, and Gaspar Saladino was involved in each of them. At its beginning in 1955, it was a historical adventure series with features The Golden Gladiator, The Viking Prince, The Silent Knight and Robin Hood. This lasted to issue #24 in 1959, and Saladino lettered many of the stories. With issue #25, the book became a tryout series for new projects, most memorably The Justice League of America beginning with issue #28. At that time, the book was in rotation among several editors, and Gaspar lettered the stories by editors Robert Kanigher and Julius Schwartz. With issue #50 in 1963, the book became a team-up series for any two DC characters, but generally the superheroes. By issue #75 in late 1967, it had morphed into Batman’s team-up book, with Batman always one of the team-up members. That version lasted until the series ended with issue #200 in 1983. For this era, Saladino lettered mainly the covers. Above is what I believe is Saladino’s first cover lettering for the book, though it’s possible those scratchy letters are the work of Ira Schnapp imitating Gaspar, as he did occasionally toward the end of his career. I can’t be sure, but I’m calling it for Gaspar, who sometimes filled in for Schnapp on cover lettering at this time.

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Incoming: ECHOLANDS 6, ECHOLANDS RAW CUT 5

Images © J.H. Williams III and W. Haden Blackman

The latest issue of this series I’m lettering has arrived, as well as the “Raw Cut” version of issue #5, which shows J.H. Williams’ art without the added coloring of Dave Stewart and with my lettering translucent so the art shows through. Alternate cover for #6 is by Francesco Francavilla, alternate cover for Raw Cut #5 is by Langdon Foss. Each issue so far has presented new lettering challenges, and here we enter the black and white world of Horror Hill for the first time. It’s been fun, and I think the story and art are worth your time. Look for them at your comics retailer, or use the links below.

GASPAR SALADINO in BOMBA THE JUNGLE BOY and THE BOOK OF FATE

All images © DC Comics. From BOMBA THE JUNGLE BOY #5, May-June 1968

Once again I’ve grouped these two titles only because of their alphabetical proximity, they have no other connection. BOMBA was one of many short-lived series from DC at the end of the 1960s. It was based on a series of low-budget films, themselves based on a series of boys’ adventure books, and clearly an attempt to interest fans of Tarzan before DC got the license to do Tarzan comics. Saladino’s involvement was brief. He lettered this cover with a large, effective caption. The logo is by Ira Schnapp, who had lettered the previous covers.

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GASPAR SALADINO in OTHER BATMAN TITLES

All images © DC Comics. From BATMAN FAMILY #7, Sept-Oct 1976

This article covers four Batman titles that I thought didn’t have enough Saladino work for separate articles. First up is BATMAN FAMILY, which ran to 20 issues from 1975 to 1978. The title was a victim of the DC Implosion, but most of the features moved into DETECTIVE COMICS. Above is the first cover with Gaspar’s lettering. At the time there was no one really guiding cover design, and this one is kind of a jumble, with too much going on and no focal point, in my opinion. Gaspar’s two blurbs describe what’s inside at least. Earlier covers had lettering by others or used only type. From this point on, Gaspar lettered most of them.

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