Category Archives: Comics

And Then I Read: GREEN LANTERNS #20

Image © DC Entertainment.

Part Two of “Polarity” begins with Jessica and Simon trapped 600 feet underwater by Doctor Polaris, who in this iteration not only has very powerful magnetic powers, but is mentally bipolar, making him difficult to reason with. Simon is freaking out, but Jessica finds a way to access her own ring powers and gets them out of the trap. Meanwhile, Polaris is having a debate with several versions of himself, while his brother and best friend lays dying of brain cancer that Polaris is convinced only he can reverse. We have some flashbacks for both Polaris and Simon explaining more of their back stories, and then an interesting interlude on Mogo, Green Lantern Corps headquarters, where events on Earth are being discussed, and a plan of action begun.

I like the writing on this title by Sam Humphries and the art on this issue by Eduardo Pansica and Julio Ferreira. Nice work on the colors (especially the flashbacks) by Blond, and fine lettering by Dave Sharpe. An entertaining read.

Recommended.

And Then I Read: THE FLASH #23

Image © DC Entertainment.

After skipping over the “Button” crossover issues, which I’m not interested in reading, I came to this one. Flash and Green Lantern team up, a familiar idea since the 1960s. Could be fun, right. But…

I think this book is trying to draw in readers who are fans of the TV show. Nothing wrong with that, but it makes for too much soap opera moaning and angst here. Barry Allen’s friends and workmates have thrown him a surprise birthday party, but he hardly seems aware of it, as he stands around reviewing all his troubles and worries. Some of his friends are understandably annoyed. Me too. Hal Jordan shows up at the party, and for a moment things brighten up. Then a villain called Multiplex crashes the scene, and action ensues. That part of the issue is more fun, though rather predictable. The twist ending is also not too surprising, so we’ll see where things go next.

Mildly recommended.

And Then I Read: BUG! #4

Image © DC Entertainment.

This series isn’t making a lot of sense to me, but I like it anyway. I feel the influence of Gerard Way this time, as the “plot” grows in absurdity and complexity with the feeling that no one, even the characters, is taking it very seriously. Meanwhile, we have great art by Michael Allred and a bunch of fun characters from Jack Kirby and elsewhere in the DC Universe (Deadman, Kobra) chasing after one McGuffin after another, hopping from one reality to another, and carrying on surreal conversations with enough humor to be entertaining. Fair enough, I’ll go along.

Recommended.

And Then I Read: WONDER WOMAN ANNUAL #1

Image © DC Entertainment.

There are four short stories in this comic. The lead story by Greg Rucka and Nicola Scott is the important one, as it features the first meeting (in current continuity) of Wonder Woman, Superman and Batman. As always, Rucka handles the characters well, playing to their strengths, and taking the opportunity to show the “boys” that Diana is very much in their league. The other three stories by other teams have Diana coming to the rescue of Aquaman villain King Shark, dealing with a noble warrior afflicted with a monstrous curse, and confronting a giant monster. All mild fun after the main course.

Recommended.

And Then I Read: MISTER MIRACLE #2

Image © DC Entertainment.

I’ve long felt that no one could handle Jack Kirby’s Fourth World characters as well as Kirby himself, but this book is proving me wrong. Writer Tom King and artist Mitch Gerads have come up with a version of Mister Miracle that is firmly anchored in the Kirby original, yet fresh and surprising. And they even do it with mostly nine-panel grid page layouts and standard comics storytelling, though there’s always a subtle feeling of oddness…is this really what’s happening to these characters, or is it some kind of dream or hallucination? Scott Free and Barda find themselves on the front lines of war on New Genesis against the forces of Darkseid, facing enemy forces again and again, relentlessly, becoming ever more weary. After they finally get a chance to rest, they’re called before Orion, the new High Father of New Genesis, who behaves in a troubling way, demanding formal courtesy and obeisance. He then sends the pair after Darkseid’s sub-commander Granny Goodness, once the mistress of Scott and Barda in their childhood, and things get even stranger.

I don’t know where this is going, but I’m intrigued. Recommended.