GASPAR SALADINO in OTHER D TITLES

All images © DC Comics. From DC 100-PAGE SUPER SPECTACULAR #5, 1971

This article is a catch-all for titles beginning with the letter D that I felt didn’t have enough Gaspar Saladino work to warrant a separate article. First up is his only cover lettering for a strange series that began with issue 4, ran to issue 6, and then later issues were absorbed into the numbering of other series. It was mostly reprints, but this cover lettering and logo by Gaspar are full of creativity, variety, and appealing styles. I particularly like the calligraphy of READ ONE GIRL’S SHOCKING STORY.

From DC SUPER-STARS #1, March 1976

Another reprint series from DC in the 1970s, though some issues had new material. This one is all reprints, and I’m not crazy about the design, but Gaspar’s lettering works fine.

From DC SUPER-STARS #3, May 1976

Another jumbled and unfocused cover design. I like Saladino’s balloons and caption, but the trade dress is a mess, and it uses one of my least favorite of Gaspar’s logo designs, for the Legion, though it’s been changed by someone else to make it worse.

From DC SUPER-STARS #7, Sept 1976

The Aquaman logo on this cover is almost as bad, with the original Ira Schnapp design given heavy-handed additions. Gaspar’s cover lettering is fine, but is overpowered by the logo, and the color holds on the lettering also make it less noticeable.

From DC SUPER-STARS #9, Nov 1976

One large art image makes this cover work much better. Gaspar’s logo is striking, and his cover lettering works well too.

From DC SUPER-STARS #17, Nov-Dec 1977

Toward the end of its eighteen issue run, the series did feature more new material, including this story introducing The Huntress. All lettering and logos are by Saladino including the names on the file folders.

From DOC SAVAGE #1, Nov 1987

This four-issue miniseries about the famous pulp magazine hero has a nice cover blurb by Gaspar on the first issue, his only work on the four.

From DOC SAVAGE #9, June 1989

The miniseries did well enough to launch a monthly series that ran 24 issues. Gaspar lettered a few of the covers. It was the style at the time to do multi-part stories within a series, and having the cover lettering reflect that, so Gaspar did this blurb and it ran on issue 10 with the PART 1 replaced by PART 2. I’ll still count it for him.

From DOC SAVAGE #19, May 1990

The same thing happened here, though Saladino did add different subtitles in each similar caption for issues 20 and 21.

From DR. FATE #1, July 1987

The long-running character Doctor Fate followed a similar path, with just the first issue of his four-issue miniseries having round captions by Gaspar, using his rough style with squared stroke ends.

From DR. FATE #23, Dec 1990

A monthly series followed, and Saladino lettered only one cover for it. I love the humor in the art and cover copy, and Gaspar has captured it in his lettering I think.

From DOORWAY TO NIGHTMARE #4, July-Aug 1978

This mystery title had a short run, it was cancelled by the “DC Implosion” of 1978. The logo is by John Workman, Gaspar lettered the caption for this issue, his only involvement in the series.

From DRAGONLANCE #1, Dec 1988

DRAGONLANCE was one of several titles licensed from TSR games. Gaspar did the top line on this first issue cover.

From DRAGONLANCE #4, Jan 1989

The blurb on this cover is beautifully done, with LIFE probably made with a brush and then outlined in pen.

From DRAGONLANCE #17, March 1990

The blurb here signals the beginning of a multi-part story…

From DRAGONLANCE #18, April 1990

…but Saladino goes with a different approach on the rest of the chapters, fine calligraphy on a textured scroll. Notice how well the words fit together even with upper and lower case.

From DC SCIENCE FICTION GRAPHIC NOVEL #1, “Hell on Earth,” Dec 1985

This series from editor Julius Schwartz ran seven issues from 1985-1987. Each was larger than a typical comic, what they call album size in Europe or Graphic Novel format in the U.S. They were square bound and printed well on glossy paper. Gaspar lettered two of them, this being the first. The upper and lower case captions are similar to his handwriting, and the pattern of words behind the last panel was probably pencilled in by artist Keith Giffen, but Saladino made it scarier.

From DC SCIENCE FICTION GRAPHIC NOVEL #2, “Nightwings,” Feb 1986

Gaspar lettered this one in more traditional styles, though I like his electric word balloons. One small creative touch is the circle behind the large A in the first caption.

From DEATHSTROKE THE TERMINATOR #10, May 1992

Deathstroke was a villain from NEW TEEN TITANS spun off into his own series in the 1990s. Gaspar lettered two consecutive issues, this being the first. Again, the handwritten captions on the album are similar to his own elegant handwriting, and I like the story title.

From DEATHSTROKE THE TERMINATOR #11, June 1992

This page from the second story shows Saladino’s occasional use of straight top and bottom edges on a word balloon that was a tight fit, and the double border around the final balloon adds emphasis in a subtle way.

From DOOM LINK (no number) 1995

Here’s a rare oddity, a comic distributed with Superman and Batman action figures. Saladino lettered the new ten-page story inside.

To sum up, I found Saladino cover lettering on these issues.

DC 100-PAGE SUPER SPECTACULAR 5

DC SUPER-STARS 1, 3, 5, 7-9, 11-12, 17

DOC SAVAGE Miniseries 1

DOC SAVAGE 9-10, 19-21

DR. FATE Miniseries 1

DR. FATE 23

DOORWAY TO NIGHTMARE 4

DRAGONLANCE 1, 4, 17-20

That’s a total of 25. Below are the stories lettered by Saladino.

DC SCIENCE FICTION GRAPHIC NOVEL #1 “Hell on Earth” 46pp

DC SCIENCE FICTION GRAPHIC NOVEL #2 “Nightwings” 46pp

DEATHSTROKE THE TERMINATOR #10 24pp

DEATHSTROKE THE TERMINATOR #11 25pp

DOOM LINK (no number): 10pp

That’s 151 pages in all. Other articles in this series are on the COMICS CREATION page of my blog.

One thought on “GASPAR SALADINO in OTHER D TITLES

  1. David Goldfarb

    I’ve always rather liked that Saladino logo for “Superboy and the Legion of Super-Heroes”, although I freely admit that childhood imprinting is likely a factor, as it was the current logo when I first discovered the book. The version with “starring the” in a burst rather than “and the” is a bit awkward, I admit, and the burst on that cover is especiall poorly placed.

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