GASPAR SALADINO in OTHER MARVEL TITLES W to Z

All images © Marvel. From WAR IS HELL #9, Oct 1974

This final article in my study of Gaspar Saladino at Marvel Comics includes books with a small amount of his lettering work through the end of the alphabet. WAR IS HELL was a war title using both reprints and new material that ran 15 issues from 1973-75. Gaspar did the two blurbs on this cover, the best indication is the style of INTRODUCING in the left one.

From WAR IS HELL #9, Oct 1974

Saladino lettered just the first page of this story otherwise lettered by Charlotte Jetter, whose style was different. He also did the title in the top banner, which I like better than the cover logo.

From WAR IS HELL #13, June 1975

War story cover lettering was old hat to Gaspar, he’d been doing it for decades at DC Comics, and his confident approach here works well.

From WARLOCK #6, June 1973

WARLOCK ran 15 issues from 1972-76. Saladino lettered the first page of this issue. His dynamic character logo/title for THE BRUTE is a bit hard to read because of the dark color on this reprint, but still effective.

From WARLOCK #7, Aug 1973

Lots of sharp corners and angles in this balloon lettering, one way Gaspar added energy and drama.

From WESTERN GUNFIGHTERS #16, July 1973

This was a reprint title for some of Marvel’s many western stories of the 1950s-60s that ran 33 issues from 1970 to 1975. Marvel’s number of titles had been restricted by their distributor Independent News (owned by DC) in the 1960s, but once that was lifted, all kinds of reprints rolled out.

From WESTERN GUNFIGHTERS #28, March 1975

I think at Marvel the balloon tails were often added later by the production staffer assembling the cover. The tail on the top burst should have been curved so that the upper end pointed toward the center.

From WESTERN TEAM-UP #1, Nov 1973

This title had only one issue. I think Gaspar did the logos as well as the cover blurbs, though some of those use type. RAWHIDE KID is great, the other one doesn’t look very western.

From WHERE MONSTERS DWELL #19, Jan 1973

This reprint book lasted 38 issues from 1970-75. Saladino did the cover lettering, though TIME CAPSULE on the bottle uses press-down type.

From WHERE MONSTERS DWELL #32, Nov 1974

Frankenstein’s monster was a favorite with readers, he had his own Marvel series for a while, this old story is not connected to that.

From WORLDS UNKNOWN #6, April 1974

This series featured new adaptations of science fiction stories. I don’t know how similar it is to the TV version, but Saladino did a fine logo and word balloon for the talking bulldozer.

From WORLDS UNKNOWN #8, Aug 1974

This issue is sword and sorcery based on a film, as described in Gaspar’s bottom blurb. I’m sure there were legal reasons for those film credits.

From ZOMBIE #4, March 1973

You may have heard of Marvel Zombies, here’s one. The covers of this black and white magazine-size comic had the title TALES OF THE ZOMBIE, but only the last word was in the indicia. Gaspar’s stylish title and credits work well, and he lettered the whole story.

To sum up, I found Saladino lettering on these covers:

WAR IS HELL #9, 13

WARLOCK #7

WESTERN GUNFIGHTERS #16, 28

WESTERN TEAM-UP #1

WHERE MONSTERS DWELL #19, 32

WORLDS UNKNOWN #6, 8

That’s ten in all. Below are the details of his story lettering.

WAR IS HELL #9: page 1 only

WARLOCK #6: page 1 only

ZOMBIE Vol 2 #1 (#4): 23pp

That’s 25 pages total. That wraps up my study of Gaspar Saladino’s lettering at Marvel. You can find all the articles in the series on the COMICS CREATION page of my blog. I’ll be moving on the Gaspar’s work at other publishers next.

2 thoughts on “GASPAR SALADINO in OTHER MARVEL TITLES W to Z

  1. David Goldfarb

    Haven’t seen the TV adaptation, but in Sturgeon’s story the alien-possessed bulldozer certainly didn’t talk.

    Not related to Saladino’s lettering, of course, but on the cover for Warlock #7, Gil Kane draws Doctor Doom’s mask as oddly anguished-looking.

  2. Michael Gallaher

    I’ve devoted way too much study to the aborted Western Team-Up (including its probable origins and the second issue), and my best guess on that odd Dakota Kid logo is that Gaspar was trying to suggest the unusual shapes of mountain ranges like the Black Hills of South Dakota.

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