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Books TitleRECOMMENDED NOVELS WRITTEN FOR CHILDREN

F) SCIENCE FICTION

ASIMOV, ISAAC (Writing as Paul French)
“David Starr, Space Ranger” (1952)
“Lucky Starr and the Pirates of the Asteroids” (1953)
And four other books in the series. Written to fit in with other space-patrol series books of the time, these stand above the crowd because of Asimov’s superior knowledge in all areas of science.

BEATTY, JEROME
“Matthew Looney’s Voyage to Earth” (1961)
And several sequels. Humorous story of a moon-boy’s adventures on our planet. Funny situations and characters.

CAMERON, ELEANOR
“The Wonderful Flight to the Mushroom Planet” (1954)
And five later books in the Mushroom Planet series. Cameron’s first book has some flaws. Her “science” is weak even for the time, and the characters undeveloped at first, but as the series progressed, so did her writing, adding much depth and power to this chronicle of a small planet harboring mushroom-based people.

CHRISTOPHER, JOHN
“The White Mountains” (1967)
And two sequels in the Tripods trilogy. Will Parker lives in a future England where the whole world has been taken under the control of giant machines from another planet. These “tripods” place mental controls on children when they reach adulthood, but Will manages to evade them, and sets out to reach a fabled haven of freedom with two other rebel children.

CLARKE, ARTHUR C.
“Islands in the Sky” (1952)
Roy wins a contest for a trip to an orbiting space station, and soon finds himself involved in a thrilling interstellar chase. This early book is not one of Clarke’s best, but has some good moments, and can introduce the reader to his fine adult fiction.

CROSS, JOHN KEIR
“The Angry Planet” (1945)
This book tells of an expedition to Mars by a group of adults and children in realistic diary-like journals. The Mars they reach would not pass today’s scientific knowledge, but the Verne-like story is well-told.

DICKINSON, PETER
“The Weathermonger” (1968)
“Heartsease” (1969)
“The Devil’s Children” (1970)
Known as the Changes trilogy, these three books take place in a near future where mankind has overthrown all the ways of science, and lives amid the ruins of technology in a mediaeval society. In each book, children try to understand the past and how their world changed, but the real focus is on characters.

FARMER, NANCY
“The Ear, The Eye and The Arm” (1994)
In Zimbabwe in 2194, three mutant detectives are hired to find the kidnapped children of General Matsika. The story is shared by these children, particularly the oldest, Tendai, as he is swept from his sheltered compound home into the roughest, strangest parts of his city. Fine writing is combined with a wealth of ideas and understanding about African life now and in the possible future.

HEINLEIN, ROBERT
“Rocket Ship Galileo” (1947)
“Space Cadet” (1948)
“Red Planet” (1949)
“Farmer in the Sky” (1950)
“Between Planets” (1951)
“The Rolling Stones” (1952)
“Starman Jones” (1953)
“The Star Beast” (1954)
“Tunnel in the Sky” (1955)
“Time for the Stars” (1956)
“Citizen of the Galaxy” (1957)
“Have Space Suit, Will Travel” (1958)
“Starship Troopers” (1959)
“Podkayne of Mars” (1963)
The best and most important books in this category, I’ve listed them all, as they aren’t always marketed as children’s books. Written by a master of the field in his prime writing period, these books are about children with intelligence, curiosity and bravery who rise to the challenges of their future. The books are full of ideas with which the reader may not always agree that encourage critical thought and personal growth. And they’re inspiring -- some of today’s scientists and astronauts cite these books as their career’s first step.

JONES, DIANA WYNNE
“A Tale of Time City” (1987)
This intricately plotted time-travel story focuses on a city outside of time that oversees history, but is now falling apart. Two boys from the city and a girl from our own time search for the reason, but every time-jump they make seems to worsen the problem.

JONES, RAYMOND F.
“Planet of Light” (1953)
A boy from Earth and his family are invited to attend a Galactic Conference. They are thrilled by the adventure until they discover their planet’s very existence is on trial. Look also for his “The Year Stardust Fell”.

LAMPMAN, EVELYN SIBLEY
“Rusty’s Space Ship” (1957)
In this light-hearted story, two boys build a backyard spaceship, and an alien creature decides it’s just the thing to get him back home. More fantasy than science fiction, really, but fun.

L’ENGLE, MADELEINE
“A Wrinkle In Time” (1962)
A fine novel about the true heart of science fiction: ideas. Meg and Calvin, two very real children, are drawn into a future of intrigue and combat between good and evil where they must make moral and personal choices that will affect everyone. Brilliant writing and characters. Three sequels followed that are worth reading, but none come close to the first.

LOWRY, LOIS
“The Giver” (1993)
Jonas lives in a future world where everything is carefully controlled and standardized to make everyone equally happy...or so it seems. When he is given the job of working with The Giver, his view of things begins to change. This remarkable and powerful book is highly recommended.

NORTON, ANDRE
“The Time Traders” (1958)
“Storm Over Warlock” (1960)
Two of this author’s many SF books. “Traders” involves traveling back to the past to investigate a crashed alien ship our government has discovered, and shows Norton’s love of ancient history. “Warlock” is an example of her other-world stories. An earthman stationed on a distant planet is the only survivor of an enemy raid, and must learn to make his way in a harsh environment. Others by Norton are usually worth trying.

NOURSE, ALAN E.
“Trouble on Titan” (1954)
First of several novels featuring young men facing adult situations against a futuristic background, this book tells of a rebellion on Saturn’s moons from the point of view of a peacekeeper.

PANSHIN, ALEXEI
“Rite of Passage” (1968)
In a future after Earth’s destruction, it’s people survive on large starships and a few colony worlds. Mia, a girl on one starship, must pass a test to achieve adulthood by surviving for a month on a hostile planet.

SEVERN, DAVID
“The Future Took Us” (1958)
Two boys are accidentally drawn into a far future ravaged by past war and returned to a primitive state. They journey to this England’s capital to confront those in power who brought them from our time.

VARLEY, JOHN
"Red Thunder" (2003)
Varley, a fine science fiction writer for adults, does his version of a Heinlein juvenile in this and the sequel "Red Lightning". An eccentric inventor creates a substance that allows a small group of young people, with some financial backing, to make and successfully launch their own spaceship. Very well done.

WRIGHTSON, PATRICIA
“Down to Earth” (1965)
In present day Sydney, Australia, the boy Martin claims to be a visitor from space. The children he befriends don’t believe him, but he does have some unusual ways of seeing their world.

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RECOMMENDED NOVELS WRITTEN FOR CHILDREN TOPICS

A) Classic Fantasy

B) Epic Fantasy

C) Animal Fantasy

D) Historical and Time Travel Fantasy

E) Other Fantasy

F) Science Fiction

G) Mystery

H) Historical

I) Classic Adventure

J) Vacation/Holiday Adventure

K) Wilderness Adventure

L) Other Adventure

M) Classic Family and Friends

N) Family and Friends

O) Real Life

P) Humor

Q) Classic Animals

R) Dogs and Cats

S) Horses

T) Other Animals and Nature

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