Todd Klein header
Home Tab
Lettering Tab
Logos Tab
Design Tab
How To Tab
Writing Tab
Art Tab
Music Tab
About Me Tab
News Tab
Contact Tab
Books Tab
Photos Tab
Links Tab
Buy Stuff Tab

Books TitleRECOMMENDED NOVELS WRITTEN FOR CHILDREN

M) CLASSIC FAMILY AND FRIENDS

ALCOTT, LOUISA MAY
“Little Women” (1868)
“Little Men” (1871)
The first of these is a remarkable book for it’s time -- focusing on the lives of four sisters and their mother on their own in a very male-oriented New England. The warm relationships, adventures, and hardships of the family are as fresh today as when written. “Little Men”, the sequel, and Alcott’s other later works are well worth reading, but none have the originality of her most famous book.

BURNETT, FRANCES HODGSON
“A Little Princess” (1905)
“The Secret Garden” (1911)
These two books tell of young girls thrown into hostile homes that must struggle to win over their new companions. “Princess” takes place in a strict English boarding school, while “Garden” explores a gloomy, run-down manor house and it’s abandoned garden. Both books are well written.

HUGHES, THOMAS
“Tom Brown’s Schooldays” (1857)
British private school is the setting for this book -- in particular Rugby. From Tom’s first nervous day to his final triumphant cricket match, and all the good and bad teachers and classmates and adventures in-between, this book set the mold for school stories to come.

KIPLING, RUDYARD
“Stalky & Co.” (1889)
Stalky and his friends are the high-spirited terrors of their school, especially their teachers. But when push comes to shove (or a poacher shows up in the partridge field) they react like fine young British men. Most of the book is very funny, in spite of the upright finale.

MONTGOMERY, L.M.
“Anne of Green Gables” (1908)
And many sequels and similar books. When the Cuthbert family of Green Gables farm agree to adopt an orphan, they expect a boy who can help with the work. Instead they get feisty, talkative Anne, full of big ideas and of no practical use. How she and the Cuthberts learn to care for each other and the people and places of Prince Edward Island, Canada are told in these well-loved books.

NESBIT, E. (Edith)
“The Story of the Treasure Seekers” (1899)
And several sequels. The close-to-home adventures of the Bastable family, narrated by Oswald Bastable, are full of humor and wisdom about children, both good and bad. Their plans always start out well but often lead to disaster...yet Oswald is always ready with another plan!

TARKINGTON, BOOTH
“Penrod” (1914)
Penrod is much in the mold of Tom Sawyer, but his adventures are more low-key and humorous, from his appearance in a local play to a disastrous birthday party, Penrod, his dog Duke, and his friend Sam struggle through childhood’s calamities, and take every opportunity for fun.

SPYRI, JOHANNA
“Heidi” (1881)
This Swiss author’s tale tells of an orphan girl who comes to live with a gruff and formidable grandfather in the Swiss alps. No sooner does she learn to love him and his world than she is taken from it to gloomy city life, where she becomes ill, and must try to return to her grandfather against all odds.

WILDER, LAURA INGALLS
“Little House in the Big Woods” (1932)
“Little House On the Prairie” (1935)
And many sequels. Wilder’s stories of her own family’s pioneer adventures have all the details of reality, but told in the warm glow of memory. The characters and situations are engaging and entertaining.

OTHER TOPICS

Jump to one of these topics in Books:

BACK TO BOOKS MAIN PAGE

RECOMMENDED NOVELS WRITTEN FOR CHILDREN TOPICS

A) Classic Fantasy

B) Epic Fantasy

C) Animal Fantasy

D) Historical and Time Travel Fantasy

E) Other Fantasy

F) Science Fiction

G) Mystery

H) Historical

I) Classic Adventure

J) Vacation/Holiday Adventure

K) Wilderness Adventure

L) Other Adventure

M) Classic Family and Friends

N) Family and Friends

O) Real Life

P) Humor

Q) Classic Animals

R) Dogs and Cats

S) Horses

T) Other Animals and Nature

Use the tabs at the top of the page to move to other areas, such as HOW TO for tips and information on how to do your own lettering.

TODD'S BLOG